Difference between revisions of "Greening Internet governance – Environmental sustainability and digital transformation – PL 04 2020"

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Internet-dependent technologies are integral part of our daily lives. Their energy needs, data-storage facilities, and planetary architecture have a direct impact on the physical environment, locally, regionally, and internationally. These technologies also play an increasingly central role in global efforts to find solutions to tackle the climate crisis and to promote environmental protection. Moreover, the growing demands of an Internet-dependent and interconnected society are contributing to unprecedented levels of e-waste and energy consumption, conflict mineral mining, and negative effects on vulnerable natural landscapes. Consequently, there is an urgent need to address the environmental impact of the ICT industry as a core issue for Internet governance in its technical, socio-economic, cultural, human rights, and political dimensions. 
 
Internet-dependent technologies are integral part of our daily lives. Their energy needs, data-storage facilities, and planetary architecture have a direct impact on the physical environment, locally, regionally, and internationally. These technologies also play an increasingly central role in global efforts to find solutions to tackle the climate crisis and to promote environmental protection. Moreover, the growing demands of an Internet-dependent and interconnected society are contributing to unprecedented levels of e-waste and energy consumption, conflict mineral mining, and negative effects on vulnerable natural landscapes. Consequently, there is an urgent need to address the environmental impact of the ICT industry as a core issue for Internet governance in its technical, socio-economic, cultural, human rights, and political dimensions. 
  
As Europe moves to implement the European Green New Deal, can its climate commitments be transformed into concrete policy actions and concerted solutions for sustainable Internet futures?
+
As Europe moves to implement the European Green Deal, can its climate commitments be transformed into concrete policy actions and concerted solutions for sustainable Internet futures?
 
This workshop addresses calls for the Internet Governance community to addressing the environmental impact of next-generation technologies (e.g. IoT, AI, data centers and server facilities, manufacturing, etc.) in light of our collective dependence on fossil fuels. The aim is to generate a shared project for to enable all stakeholders to urgently move together so that Internet Governance can contribute to mitigating the climate crisis: e.g. strategies for a circular economy, by promoting the design of rights-based and environmentally conscious technologies, environmental accountability, and incentives to reuse and repair.
 
This workshop addresses calls for the Internet Governance community to addressing the environmental impact of next-generation technologies (e.g. IoT, AI, data centers and server facilities, manufacturing, etc.) in light of our collective dependence on fossil fuels. The aim is to generate a shared project for to enable all stakeholders to urgently move together so that Internet Governance can contribute to mitigating the climate crisis: e.g. strategies for a circular economy, by promoting the design of rights-based and environmentally conscious technologies, environmental accountability, and incentives to reuse and repair.
  

Revision as of 13:27, 23 May 2020

Consolidated programme 2020 overview / Day 2

Proposals: #100, #126, #127, #128, #154

You are invited to become a member of the session Org Team! By joining a Org Team you agree to that your name and affiliation will be published at the respective wiki page of the session for transparency reasons. Please subscribe to the mailing list to join the Org Team and answer the email that will be send to you requesting your confirmation of subscription.

Session information

Date: Wednesday, 12 June 2020

Time: 17:00 - 18:00 CEST (UTC+2)

Session teaser

Internet Governance is inseparable from the well-being of our physical environment. This plenary considers how all stakeholders in Europe can make a difference now to ensure the development of environmentally sustainable internet and digital technologies, by eliminating their carbon footprint and their dependence on non-renewable and inhumane sources of energy and raw materials.

The session will ask representatives from governments, the technical community, and civil society to present clear, and feasible action plans for their contribution to ensuring the environmental sustainability of internet design and use. It will consider what sorts of accountability mechanisms are needed to support all stakeholders in their respective roles towards Greening Internet Governance.

Session description

Until .

Internet-dependent technologies are integral part of our daily lives. Their energy needs, data-storage facilities, and planetary architecture have a direct impact on the physical environment, locally, regionally, and internationally. These technologies also play an increasingly central role in global efforts to find solutions to tackle the climate crisis and to promote environmental protection. Moreover, the growing demands of an Internet-dependent and interconnected society are contributing to unprecedented levels of e-waste and energy consumption, conflict mineral mining, and negative effects on vulnerable natural landscapes. Consequently, there is an urgent need to address the environmental impact of the ICT industry as a core issue for Internet governance in its technical, socio-economic, cultural, human rights, and political dimensions. 

As Europe moves to implement the European Green Deal, can its climate commitments be transformed into concrete policy actions and concerted solutions for sustainable Internet futures? This workshop addresses calls for the Internet Governance community to addressing the environmental impact of next-generation technologies (e.g. IoT, AI, data centers and server facilities, manufacturing, etc.) in light of our collective dependence on fossil fuels. The aim is to generate a shared project for to enable all stakeholders to urgently move together so that Internet Governance can contribute to mitigating the climate crisis: e.g. strategies for a circular economy, by promoting the design of rights-based and environmentally conscious technologies, environmental accountability, and incentives to reuse and repair.

The objective of this session is to produce concrete commitments for action to promote a sustainable Internet based on Europe's commitment to a Green Future. 

Questions addressed in this session include, but are not limited to: 

  • How is environmental sustainability connected to Internet Governance, and how can Internet Governance contribute to sustainable futures?
  • What regulatory frameworks are needed in order to ensure an environmentally sustainable digital transformation in Europe?
  • How can all stakeholders work together to accelerate a transition to a circular economy able to deliver the environmental sustainability of internet-connected technologies – from infrastructure, design, and manufacture, to services and consumption?
  •  

    This interactive plenary considers how all stakeholders in Europe can make a difference now to ensure the development of environmentally sustainable internet and digital technologies, by eliminating their carbon footprint and their dependence on non-renewable and inhumane sources of energy and raw materials.

    The session will ask representatives from governments, the technical community, and civil society to present clear and feasible action plans for their contribution to ensuring the environmental sustainability of Internet design and use. It will consider what sorts of accountability mechanisms are needed to support all stakeholders in their respective roles towards greening Internet Governance, and welcomes rich and robust discussion.

    Format

    Until .

    Please try out new interactive formats. EuroDIG is about dialogue not about statements, presentations and speeches. Workshops should not be organised as a small plenary.

    Further reading

    Links to relevant websites, declarations, books, documents. Please note we cannot offer web space, so only links to external resources are possible. Example for an external link: Website of EuroDIG

    • EuroDIG 2017 WS 11: Drowning in data: Digital pollution, green IT, and sustainable access (link)
    • Climate change impacts in Europe (link)

    People

    Until .

    Please provide name and institution for all people you list here.

    Focal Point

    • Minda Moreira

    Organising Team (Org Team) List them here as they sign up.

    • Michael J. Oghia
    • Marianne Franklin - IRPC
    • Vittorio Bertola
    • IRPC Steering Committee Reps
    • Marcel Krummenauer
    • Alex Lutz
    • Sofia Badari
    • Mando Rachovitsa
    • Livia Walpen
    • Leandro Navarro
    • Lea Rosa Holtfreter
    • Sebastiaan Berting

    Key Participants

    Key Participants are experts willing to provide their knowledge during a session – not necessarily on stage. Key Participants should contribute to the session planning process and keep statements short and punchy during the session. They will be selected and assigned by the Org Team, ensuring a stakeholder balanced dialogue also considering gender and geographical balance. Please provide short CV’s of the Key Participants involved in your session at the Wiki or link to another source.

    Co-Moderators

    Remote Moderator

    Trained remote moderators will be assigned on the spot by the EuroDIG secretariat to each session.

    Reporter

    Reporters will be assigned by the EuroDIG secretariat in cooperation with the Geneva Internet Platform. The Reporter takes notes during the session and formulates 3 (max. 5) bullet points at the end of each session that:

    • are summarised on a slide and presented to the audience at the end of each session
    • relate to the particular session and to European Internet governance policy
    • are forward looking and propose goals and activities that can be initiated after EuroDIG (recommendations)
    • are in (rough) consensus with the audience

    Current discussion, conference calls, schedules and minutes

    On 26 March 2020, we held our first online meeting. The minutes of the meeting are available here. We have since using the same pad to take notes.

    Messages

    A short summary of the session will be provided by the Reporter.

    Video record

    Will be provided here after the event.

    Transcript

    Will be provided here after the event.